Management of Trauma Patients- Know It All

Deaths and injuries caused by automobile accidents are undeniably a rising public health issue in our country. And has become one of the leading causes of death among young adults. This may range from small injuries to severe life- threatning multi-organ failure injuries.

Adequate knowledge and understanding of basic life support skills among first responders are important. This will ensure that persons can administer crucial life-saving interventions even before the patient arrives at the hospital. In this blog, we have discussed the same with our experts offering accident and trauma care in Bangalore.

If someone is hurt in an accident, be sure that neither you nor the wounded person is in any danger. If you are, make the situation safe for both of you.

Let’s see the order of events after someone has met with an accident.

  • Prehospital care- Prehospital treatment for trauma patients is situation dependent and focuses on patient stabilization and quick transfer to a hospital.

Nonmedical workers who have received basic life support training may give potentially life-saving measures.

Once the patient is transferred to the nearest hospital, the medical personnel at emergency services will perform the ABCDE approach( A-airway, B-breathing, C- circulation, D- disability, and E- exposure)

  • Transport to the hospital- there are several medical interventions i.e required prior to the transport of the patient to the hospital.

-The use of a cervical collar(If the cervical spine injury is suspected)

-Intubation or the provide oxygen using a nasal cannula (if respiratory distress or altered mental status is suspected)

-Intravenous fluid administration; (if hemorrhage or hypotension is suspected)

-Analgesia administration

-Tourniquets or pressure bandages are used to control bleeding.

  • Advanced Trauma Life Support(ATLS)- The initial survey is the first step in the care of trauma victims (Also known as Advanced Trauma Life Support, or ATLS).

This consists of five phases that must be completed in order (ABCDE method).

 

-A (airway)- If the person is not responding, ask them loudly if they are OK and if they can open their eyes.

If they answer, you can keep them in their current situation until medical help arrives.

While you wait, continue to monitor their respiration, pulse, and level of response:

  • Are they awake?
  • Do they reply when you speak to them?
  • Is there no response to any stimulation (do they appear to be unconscious)?

If there is no reaction, keep the individual in their current posture and open their airway.

If this isn't feasible in their current posture, gently lie them on their back and try to open their airway.

Place one hand on the person's forehead and gently tilt their head back, elevating the tip of the chin with two fingers to open the airway.

This shifts the tongue's position farther from the back of the throat.

Avoid pushing on the bottom of the mouth as this will cause the tongue to rise and restrict the airway.

 

-B (breathing)- To see if a person is still breathing, do the following:

  • Examine their chest to check if it is rising and sinking.
  • Listen for breathing noises above their lips and nose.
  • For 10 seconds, feel their breath against your cheek.

If they're breathing properly, put them in the recovery position to keep their airway clear of blockages, and keep an eye on their breathing.

Keep this in mind- Normal breathing does not include gasping or erratic(irregular) breathing.

 

-C (circulation)- If the patient isn't breathing regularly, you must begin chest compressions right away.

In the initial few minutes following a sudden cardiac arrest, agonal breathing is typical (when the heart stops beating).

Agonal breathing is characterized by abrupt, uneven gasps of breath. This should not be confused with regular breathing, and CPR should be administered immediately.

 

-D (disability)- for neurogenic evaluation i.e

Examine the patient's Glasgow Coma Score on a scale

A score of 8 or less indicates that intubation is necessary.

Examine pupillary size

Assess motor function and mild touch sensation if the patient is interactive.

 

-E (exposure)-

Completely undress the patient.

Examine the patient's back for evidence of occult injury.

If the patient is hypothermic, use warm blankets and warm intravenous fluids to keep them warm.

You can visit United Hospital, one of the best hospitals in Bangalore, for more queries. Our experts offer trauma surgery in Jayanagar and have all the latest equipment to take proper care of their patients.

Posted on : 13/05/2022      Views : 22

Management of Trauma Patients- Know It All

Deaths and injuries caused by automobile accidents are undeniably a rising public health issue in our country. And has become one of the leading causes of death among young adults. This may range from small injuries to severe life- threatning multi-organ failure injuries.

Adequate knowledge and understanding of basic life support skills among first responders are important. This will ensure that persons can administer crucial life-saving interventions even before the patient arrives at the hospital. In this blog, we have discussed the same with our experts offering accident and trauma care in Bangalore.

If someone is hurt in an accident, be sure that neither you nor the wounded person is in any danger. If you are, make the situation safe for both of you.

Let’s see the order of events after someone has met with an accident.

  • Prehospital care- Prehospital treatment for trauma patients is situation dependent and focuses on patient stabilization and quick transfer to a hospital.

Nonmedical workers who have received basic life support training may give potentially life-saving measures.

Once the patient is transferred to the nearest hospital, the medical personnel at emergency services will perform the ABCDE approach( A-airway, B-breathing, C- circulation, D- disability, and E- exposure)

  • Transport to the hospital- there are several medical interventions i.e required prior to the transport of the patient to the hospital.

-The use of a cervical collar(If the cervical spine injury is suspected)

-Intubation or the provide oxygen using a nasal cannula (if respiratory distress or altered mental status is suspected)

-Intravenous fluid administration; (if hemorrhage or hypotension is suspected)

-Analgesia administration

-Tourniquets or pressure bandages are used to control bleeding.

  • Advanced Trauma Life Support(ATLS)- The initial survey is the first step in the care of trauma victims (Also known as Advanced Trauma Life Support, or ATLS).

This consists of five phases that must be completed in order (ABCDE method).

 

-A (airway)- If the person is not responding, ask them loudly if they are OK and if they can open their eyes.

If they answer, you can keep them in their current situation until medical help arrives.

While you wait, continue to monitor their respiration, pulse, and level of response:

  • Are they awake?
  • Do they reply when you speak to them?
  • Is there no response to any stimulation (do they appear to be unconscious)?

If there is no reaction, keep the individual in their current posture and open their airway.

If this isn't feasible in their current posture, gently lie them on their back and try to open their airway.

Place one hand on the person's forehead and gently tilt their head back, elevating the tip of the chin with two fingers to open the airway.

This shifts the tongue's position farther from the back of the throat.

Avoid pushing on the bottom of the mouth as this will cause the tongue to rise and restrict the airway.

 

-B (breathing)- To see if a person is still breathing, do the following:

  • Examine their chest to check if it is rising and sinking.
  • Listen for breathing noises above their lips and nose.
  • For 10 seconds, feel their breath against your cheek.

If they're breathing properly, put them in the recovery position to keep their airway clear of blockages, and keep an eye on their breathing.

Keep this in mind- Normal breathing does not include gasping or erratic(irregular) breathing.

 

-C (circulation)- If the patient isn't breathing regularly, you must begin chest compressions right away.

In the initial few minutes following a sudden cardiac arrest, agonal breathing is typical (when the heart stops beating).

Agonal breathing is characterized by abrupt, uneven gasps of breath. This should not be confused with regular breathing, and CPR should be administered immediately.

 

-D (disability)- for neurogenic evaluation i.e

Examine the patient's Glasgow Coma Score on a scale

A score of 8 or less indicates that intubation is necessary.

Examine pupillary size

Assess motor function and mild touch sensation if the patient is interactive.

 

-E (exposure)-

Completely undress the patient.

Examine the patient's back for evidence of occult injury.

If the patient is hypothermic, use warm blankets and warm intravenous fluids to keep them warm.

You can visit United Hospital, one of the best hospitals in Bangalore, for more queries. Our experts offer trauma surgery in Jayanagar and have all the latest equipment to take proper care of their patients.