What is a Ventilator and When Should You Need One

Most of us would have come across the word ventilator in the healthcare system. It forms an integral and crucial part of the critical care system, especially during an emergency that relates to breathing.

Critical care specialists in Bangalore associated with United Hospital explain about ventilators in greater depth for patient understanding.

What is a Ventilator?

According to experienced doctors associated with United Hospital, recognised as the best critical care hospital in Bangalore, ventilators are automated machines that help patients with artificial breathing when their lungs fail to operate required. In more simple terms, ventilators contribute as a life support system.

Doctors may recommend ventilator support depending on how serious the emergency is at the moment.

How does a ventilator operate?

Expert critical care doctors operating at the best hospital in Bangalore explain that a ventilator is helped to supply oxygen to your body. The air passes through a tube that goes into your mouth and passes right through the windpipe. The patient’s vital parameters like blood pressure, heart rate and pulse rate are continuously monitored when he/she is put on this life support system.

Doctors will fix the frequency of activity depending on the criticality involved.

Experienced ICU doctors in Bangalore indicate that once the patient shows signs of improvement from the critical situation, doctors begin a process called ventilator weaning. During this trial period, the patient is allowed to breathe on his own but still with the ventilator attached in case needed.

When is a ventilator most needed?

Critical care doctors in Bangalore with abundant experience in handling emergency cases indicate that a ventilator is most required when,

  • The patient is suffering from low oxygen levels
  • There is shortness of breath due to an infection
  • The patient suffers from a traumatic brain injury
  • The patient suffers from a stroke
  • assist the patient in breathing which has been affected due to weak muscles or an injury to the nervous system.

Posted on : 13/07/2023      Views : 899

What is a Ventilator and When Should You Need One

Most of us would have come across the word ventilator in the healthcare system. It forms an integral and crucial part of the critical care system, especially during an emergency that relates to breathing.

Critical care specialists in Bangalore associated with United Hospital explain about ventilators in greater depth for patient understanding.

What is a Ventilator?

According to experienced doctors associated with United Hospital, recognised as the best critical care hospital in Bangalore, ventilators are automated machines that help patients with artificial breathing when their lungs fail to operate required. In more simple terms, ventilators contribute as a life support system.

Doctors may recommend ventilator support depending on how serious the emergency is at the moment.

How does a ventilator operate?

Expert critical care doctors operating at the best hospital in Bangalore explain that a ventilator is helped to supply oxygen to your body. The air passes through a tube that goes into your mouth and passes right through the windpipe. The patient’s vital parameters like blood pressure, heart rate and pulse rate are continuously monitored when he/she is put on this life support system.

Doctors will fix the frequency of activity depending on the criticality involved.

Experienced ICU doctors in Bangalore indicate that once the patient shows signs of improvement from the critical situation, doctors begin a process called ventilator weaning. During this trial period, the patient is allowed to breathe on his own but still with the ventilator attached in case needed.

When is a ventilator most needed?

Critical care doctors in Bangalore with abundant experience in handling emergency cases indicate that a ventilator is most required when,

  • The patient is suffering from low oxygen levels
  • There is shortness of breath due to an infection
  • The patient suffers from a traumatic brain injury
  • The patient suffers from a stroke
  • assist the patient in breathing which has been affected due to weak muscles or an injury to the nervous system.