Bleeding after Menopause: What could it mean?

Menopause is not a disease, but rather a stage that comes in every women's life when she stops ovulating and loses her ability to conceive. The majority of women reach Menopause in their 40s or 50s. There is a gradual decline in the levels of reproductive hormones in the body and once you reach menopause, you stop having your monthly periods. As per the best Gynecologist doctor in Jayanagar, a woman is said to be in menopause when she has not menstruated for 12 months since her last period. By now you must have understood what menopause means, however, there is something else we would like to talk about - Postmenopausal bleeding.
The term is commonly used to describe vaginal bleeding that is experienced by a woman after she reaches menopause i.e. after 12 months of not seeing any menstrual blood. There can be multiple reasons behind this, the majority of which are benign in nature. Most women experience postmenopausal bleeding due to certain gynecological conditions like polyps and fibroids. However, there is about a 10 percent chance that it could be linked to a malignancy like endometrial cancer.
Many women tend to take post-menopausal bleeding lightly, however experts from the best gynecologist hospital in Bangalore, emphasize the importance of early medical intervention. Getting yourself evaluated at the earliest will not only help in the detection of the underlying problem but also help your doctors to curate a proper treatment plan to be followed.

In this blog, we have listed some common medical conditions that could be associated with post-menopausal bleeding:
Cervical polyps - These are tiny, finger or bulb-like growths that develop in the cervix, which refers to the lower part of the uterus that connects to the vagina. Polyps are very common in women above 20 years of age who have given multiple births. These are extremely rare in girls who have not hit puberty yet. It has been found that many women suffering from cervical polyps do not experience any symptoms and these are usually detected during a pap smear test. Some common symptoms that have been associated with polyps include vaginal bleeding, heaviness in the pelvic area, and pain.
Endometrial atrophy - The condition is marked by the thinning of the endometrial lining due to the loss of endometrial glands. It is caused by a decrease in the levels of hormones, like estrogen and progesterone, after menopause.
Endometrial hyperplasia - As the name suggests, the condition also involves the endometrial lining and is the complete opposite of endometrial atrophy. In this case, the uterine lining becomes thick, leading to heavy bleeding. Endometrial hyperplasia is a known risk factor for cancers of the endometrium and uterus. A woman can develop the problem during or even after menopause. The problem is rare but serious, hence the symptoms should not be taken likely.
Uterine cancer - The uterus or womb is a female reproductive organ in which the fetus grows and develops. Uterus cancer is marked by the growth of abnormal tissues and cells in the uterus. The problem usually starts in the endometrial lining and this is the reason why it is also referred to as endometrial cancer. Women suffering from it often experience abnormal vaginal discharge apart from bleeding.
Ovarian cancer - Postmenopausal bleeding could also be a result of ovarian cancer which is marked by the abnormal growth of cells in the ovaries. Although the cancer is rare, it progresses at a very fast pace, and hence is potentially serious. Most women do not usually experience any major symptoms in the initial stages of cancer and these developed gradually over time.

If you are also experiencing post-menopausal bleeding it is important to get yourself evaluated at the earliest.

Posted on : 01/08/2022      Views : 102

Bleeding after Menopause: What could it mean?

Menopause is not a disease, but rather a stage that comes in every women's life when she stops ovulating and loses her ability to conceive. The majority of women reach Menopause in their 40s or 50s. There is a gradual decline in the levels of reproductive hormones in the body and once you reach menopause, you stop having your monthly periods. As per the best Gynecologist doctor in Jayanagar, a woman is said to be in menopause when she has not menstruated for 12 months since her last period. By now you must have understood what menopause means, however, there is something else we would like to talk about - Postmenopausal bleeding.
The term is commonly used to describe vaginal bleeding that is experienced by a woman after she reaches menopause i.e. after 12 months of not seeing any menstrual blood. There can be multiple reasons behind this, the majority of which are benign in nature. Most women experience postmenopausal bleeding due to certain gynecological conditions like polyps and fibroids. However, there is about a 10 percent chance that it could be linked to a malignancy like endometrial cancer.
Many women tend to take post-menopausal bleeding lightly, however experts from the best gynecologist hospital in Bangalore, emphasize the importance of early medical intervention. Getting yourself evaluated at the earliest will not only help in the detection of the underlying problem but also help your doctors to curate a proper treatment plan to be followed.

In this blog, we have listed some common medical conditions that could be associated with post-menopausal bleeding:
Cervical polyps - These are tiny, finger or bulb-like growths that develop in the cervix, which refers to the lower part of the uterus that connects to the vagina. Polyps are very common in women above 20 years of age who have given multiple births. These are extremely rare in girls who have not hit puberty yet. It has been found that many women suffering from cervical polyps do not experience any symptoms and these are usually detected during a pap smear test. Some common symptoms that have been associated with polyps include vaginal bleeding, heaviness in the pelvic area, and pain.
Endometrial atrophy - The condition is marked by the thinning of the endometrial lining due to the loss of endometrial glands. It is caused by a decrease in the levels of hormones, like estrogen and progesterone, after menopause.
Endometrial hyperplasia - As the name suggests, the condition also involves the endometrial lining and is the complete opposite of endometrial atrophy. In this case, the uterine lining becomes thick, leading to heavy bleeding. Endometrial hyperplasia is a known risk factor for cancers of the endometrium and uterus. A woman can develop the problem during or even after menopause. The problem is rare but serious, hence the symptoms should not be taken likely.
Uterine cancer - The uterus or womb is a female reproductive organ in which the fetus grows and develops. Uterus cancer is marked by the growth of abnormal tissues and cells in the uterus. The problem usually starts in the endometrial lining and this is the reason why it is also referred to as endometrial cancer. Women suffering from it often experience abnormal vaginal discharge apart from bleeding.
Ovarian cancer - Postmenopausal bleeding could also be a result of ovarian cancer which is marked by the abnormal growth of cells in the ovaries. Although the cancer is rare, it progresses at a very fast pace, and hence is potentially serious. Most women do not usually experience any major symptoms in the initial stages of cancer and these developed gradually over time.

If you are also experiencing post-menopausal bleeding it is important to get yourself evaluated at the earliest.